A Postscript to “Monsters of the Night”

A Postscript to “Monsters of the Night”

“Monsters of the Night”, my review of The Myth of the Born Criminal by Jarkko Jalava, Stephanie Griffiths, and Michael Maraun, is now live at the Literary Review of Canada. Unfortunately, I had to excise a few sentences to keep within the magazine's word limit, and a bit of context was lost in the shuffle. Count this, then, as a very brief postscript. 

 

Asymmetries of Relatedness

Asymmetries of Relatedness

For five years—and probably more—I've been tinkering with an idea. I think it may be the most interesting one I've ever had, and I'm overjoyed to say that it's just been published in fine form in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. (Don't worry: there's a video at the bottom of this page that will make sense of it, I promise. Feel free to skip to the end if you'd rather not wait.)

Altruism, Spite, and Everything in Between

Altruism, Spite, and Everything in Between

In the spirit of accessibility, we're creating a video series to explain a few of our papers. Our first one spells out the best definitions, in our opinion, of commonly used terms in social evolution.

Steven Pinker on the Prospect of Peace

Steven Pinker on the Prospect of Peace

We live in the most peaceful time humans have ever known, but you would be forgiven for thinking otherwise. In the wake of civil war in Syria, Iraq, and South Sudan, in the news reports of a multiple homicide in your city, in the increasing layers of security you are subject to whenever you attempt the trip from the airline check-in desk to your departure gate, it is impossible not to get the impression that we live in one of the bloodiest times in history. Nevertheless, Steven Pinker has convincingly proved that impression wrong.

Friendship and Kinship

Friendship and Kinship

Over the last two weeks, media coverage of an article has repeatedly found its way into my inbox. It’s an interesting piece by Nicholas Christakis and James Fowler on the genetics of friendship. The article is very technical, but the take-away is perfectly simple: friends have more genes in common than you’d expect, except where they have fewer genes in common than what you’d expect. OK, so maybe it’s not perfectly simple.

Billionaires Are People, Too!

Billionaires Are People, Too!

Last January, the Wall Street Journal published a spectacularly hyperbolic letter. Written by billionaire venture capitalist Tom Perkins, it likened today’s “rich” to Jewish Germans living in the shadow of the Nazis, defended novelist Danielle Steel (Perkins’ ex-wife) against allegations of snobbery, and warned of “a rising tide of hatred of the successful one percent” that is bound to culminate in a “progressive” Kristallnacht. As this fretful piece made the rounds, it was ridiculedpartially recantedawkwardly defended, and, as is par for the course, made worse in the retelling.

The Boy Who Cried Wolf (When It Suited Him)

The Boy Who Cried Wolf (When It Suited Him)

There’s a good chance that you’re familiar with the Homeland Security Advisory System (HSAS), even if you don’t know it by name. Replaced in 2011 by the National Terrorism Advisory System, it was that color-coded notification system developed in the wake of 9/11 that ostensibly functioned to alert the public of a probable terrorist threat to the United States. Green indicated a low risk of attack; blue, a general risk; yellow, an elevated risk; orange, a high risk; and red, a severe risk. In spite of the supposed “generality” of the blue level, the advisory had not once been lower than an “elevated” yellow in its nine years of existence. Instead, it vacillated between yellow and orange for the most part, though it did strike red in 2006.

Loading the Dice

Loading the Dice

As I argued previously, reproductive variance was the first inequality—all other forms that matter to us, like income inequality, do so because they have historically been related to reproductive variance. Those with more resources, for instance, had more babies that survived to reproduce; when possible, those babies also tended to inherit their parents’ resources, starting the cycle anew. These chronic effects on reproductive success have imposed selection pressures on the human mind to compete optimally for resources.